E+P Plus logo
ESG
takes root
Achieving real results,
not satisfying buzzwords
Black plus
Q&A with Lorenzo Simonelli headshot
LNG Analysis story
Additive Manufacturing story
Regional Report: South America story
October 2020
E+P Plus logo
ESG
takes root
Achieving real results,
not satisfying buzzwords
Black plus
Q&A with Lorenzo Simonelli headshot
LNG Analysis story
Additive Manufacturing story
Regional Report: South America story
October 2020
A Hart Energy Publication
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E+P Plus logo
October 2020 + Vol. 95 + Issue 10
A new industry workforce
Baker Hughes CEO talks OFS companies and the road ahead in a new energy world
Another step closer to real-time hydraulic fracture design
Carbon emissions and ESG
The future of additive manufacturing
Looking ahead to a post-pandemic gas market
Realizing the value of data in oil and gas
Improving recovery in natural gas wells with artificial lift
EP Plus October 2020 cover
Oil and gas rig in the ocean
Plus
Sponsored Content
Higher natural gas prices lift producers’ spirits
Virtual Conference DUG logo
South America Graphic
South America’s pending success to overshadow harsh 2020
Smart glasses provide immersive experience
A compilation of the industry’s latest upstream technologies
E&P activity across the U.S.
Drilling activity around the world
Promotions, new hires and the latest company news
The intersection of sustainability and digital
Cartoon megaphone
A new industry workforce
Baker Hughes CEO talks OFS companies and the road ahead in a new energy world
Another step closer to real-time hydraulic fracture design
Carbon emissions and ESG
The future of additive manufacturing
Looking ahead to a post-pandemic gas market
Realizing the value of data in oil and gas
Oil and gas rig in the ocean
Improving recovery in natural gas wells with artificial lift
Sponsored Content
Higher natural gas prices lift producers’ spirits
Virtual Conference DUG logo
South America Graphic
South America’s pending success to overshadow harsh 2020
Smart glasses provide immersive experience
A compilation of the industry’s latest upstream technologies
E&P activity across the U.S.
Drilling activity around the world
Promotions, new hires and the latest company news
The intersection of sustainability and digital
Cartoon megaphone
EP Plus October 2020 cover
About The Cover: This tumultuous year helped speed up the growth of ESG in the oil and gas industry. While the seeds of ESG reporting had been sown, there’s little doubt they’ve taken root. But what is real action beyond satisfying buzzwords? The industry struggles to define its successes in reducing emissions and making progress in social responsibility and corporate governance. (Cover images courtesy of bookzv/ Shutterstock.com; Bottom images from left to right courtesy of Baker Hughes, Wojciech Wrzesien/ Shutterstock.com, Siemens, and Mdesignstudio/ Shutterstock.com; Cover design by Alexa Sanders)
Coming Next Month: The November cover story will focus on data analytics and will feature interviews with IFS, Schlumberger, IBM, Halliburton, Honeywell, ABB, Equinor and Deloitte, plus video! The Executive Q&A will showcase an exclusive video interview with Schlumberger’s Hinda Gharbi, EVP of Services & Equipment. The Operator Spotlight will feature an exclusive interview with Goodrich Petroleum, and the Regional Report will highlight Southeast Asia. As always, E&P Plus will include its exploration, drilling, completions, production and offshore features in every issue.
E&P Plus (ISSN 1527-4063) (PM40036185) is published monthly by Hart Energy Publishing, LP, 1616 S. Voss Road, Suite 1000, Houston, Texas 77057. Advertising rates furnished upon request. All subscriber inquiries should be addressed to E&P Plus, 1616 S. Voss Road, Suite 1000, Houston, TX 77057; Telephone: 713-260-6442, Fax: 713-840-1449; custserv@hartenergy.com. Copyright © Hart Energy Publishing, LP, 2020. Hart Energy Publishing, LP reserves all rights to editorial matter. No article may be reproduced or transmitted in whole or in parts by any means without written permission of the publisher. Federal copyright law prohibits unauthorized reproduction by any means and imposes fines of up to $25,000 for violations.
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HartEnergy.com
Editorial Director
Len Vermillion

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Group Senior Editor
Velda Addison

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Senior Editor
Brian Walzel

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Senior Editor
Darren Barbee

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Senior Editor
Joseph Markman

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Activity Editor
Larry Prado

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Associate Editors

Mary Holcomb
mholcomb@hartenergy.com

Faiza Rizvi
frizvi@hartenergy.com

Editor-at-Large
Nissa Darbonne

ndarbonne@hartenergy.com

Senior Managing Editor, Publications
Ariana Hurtado

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Senior Managing Editor, Digital Media
Emily Patsy

epatsy@hartenergy.com

Assistant Managing Editor
Bill Walter

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Creative Director
Alexa Sanders

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Art Director
Melissa Ritchie

mritchie@hartenergy.com

Publisher
Darrin West

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Senior Vice President, Media, E&P/Conferences
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Chief Financial Officer
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Online Content +
Exclusives Available Only Online
EOG building in sunset
EOG commits to ‘staying disciplined’ amid market uncertainty
By Velda Addison, Group Senior Editor
The company also looks to focus on its premium inventory as it pursues exploration opportunities.
Concho Resources eyes efficiency gains in Permian Basin
By Velda Addison, Group Senior Editor
Simultaneous fracs are among the methods being discussed by some U.S. shale players to drill and complete wells faster and more efficiently.
Oil majors work to advance offshore wind energy
By Velda Addison, Group Senior Editor
Executives from Equinor, Shell, Total and WindEurope discuss how producers of oil and gas are transferring knowledge to offshore wind.
Exploration outlook: key oil, gas prospects to watch post-COVID-19
By Velda Addison, Group Senior Editor
Despite spending cuts made across the oil and gas industry, some companies are moving ahead with plans to drill exploration wells.
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HART ENERGY VIDEOS
By Jessica Morales, Director of Video Content
Leaders from ‘Big 4’—Deloitte, EY, KPMG, PwC—provide recovery outlook for energy
Leaders from the “Big Four” accounting firms—Deloitte, EY, KPMG and PwC—joined Hart Energy’s Emily Patsy to discuss the biggest hurdles facing their clients this downturn and what the oil and gas industry will look like post-pandemic.
Leaders from Deloitte, EY, KPMG, PwC on zoom call
DNV GL’s Liv Hovem on the energy transition and what it means for shale
The company’s 2020 Energy Transition Outlook forecasts that carbon emission reductions will fall far short of the Paris Agreement’s 2050 goals. Liv Hovem, CEO of DNV GL – Oil & Gas, discussed the conclusions of the report with Hart Energy’s Joseph Markman.
Liv Hovem, CEO of DNV GL, on zoom call with Joseph Markman
Honeywell CTO on remote oilfield tech, data analytics
Jason Urso, CTO of Honeywell Process Solutions, joined Hart Energy’s Faiza Rizvi to explain the growing significance of remote technologies in the current environment in which oil and gas companies operate.
Babst Calland attorneys target oil and gas political issues to watch
As the November election draws closer, Hart Energy’s Len Vermillion and Joseph Markman sat down with Babst Calland’s Kevin Garber and Jean Mosites who analyze the stance of major party candidates on key environmental issues and what the oil and gas industry can anticipate, depending on the victors.
Len Vermillion and Joseph Markman sat down with Babst Calland’s Kevin Garber and Jean Mosites in zoom call
As I See It text
A new industry workforce
Oilfield jobs have taken a stunning hit, but the drive toward digitalization and a low-carbon future will create new opportunities for the industry’s workers.
Image of humanoids lined up
Image of humanoids lined up
A new industry workforce
Oilfield jobs have taken a stunning hit, but the drive toward digitalization and a low-carbon future will create new opportunities for the industry’s workers.
B

y any measure, and by any lens through which it is viewed, the number of job losses in the oil and gas industry has been staggering. According to a recent report by the Petroleum Equipment and Services Association (PESA), layoffs in the oilfield services (OFS) sector linked to pandemic-related demand destruction hit more than 103,000 in August. Producers have laid off tens of thousands more. Texas, the country’s leading oil producer, has been hit the hardest with some 50,000 job losses, more than the next six states with the most layoffs combined.

If there is good news to be found in all of this, it is that the industry layoffs are beginning to plateau. Between January and May, the OFS sector saw nearly 85,000 layoffs. But from May to August, the sector has seen just under 20,000 job losses, according to PESA.

There is, of course, optimism for 2021. The hope of a vaccine and an expected increase in global energy demand mean that many jobs could return next year. But what will those jobs look like? In many ways, the jobs that were lost might not be the same ones that return.

Brian Walzel Headhsot
Brian Walzel
Executive Q&A
Video icon
Q&A text
Baker Hughes CEO talks OFS companies and the road ahead in a new energy world
In this video, Baker Hughes CEO Lorenzo Simonelli chats with Hart Energy’s Editorial Director Len Vermillion in an exclusive interview about the path forward for the oil and gas industry.
Baker Hughes CEO talks OFS companies and the road ahead in a new energy world
Lorenzo Simonelli discusses the digital transformation, offshore technology, LNG, the energy transition and more.
Len Vermillion, Editorial Director

A

s an energy technology company, Baker Hughes’ portfolio spans across oil and gas, alternative and renewable energy, as well as other industrial sectors, making it well positioned to respond to various market opportunities.

Lorenzo Simonelli, chairman and CEO of Baker Hughes, recently provided E&P Plus with an exclusive video interview in which he shared his views on the way forward for oilfield service companies in a post-pandemic future.

In addition, the Q&A below delves into even more details on Baker Hughes’ plans and strategies presently and looking ahead.

World View
Another step closer to real-time hydraulic fracture design
With the commercialization of a sealed wellbore pressure monitoring system, more operators have access to improving the efficiency of their fracture clusters.
Hart Energy Staff

T

he holy grail of optimizing well completions is the ability to design in real time a hydraulic fracturing operation. Slowly fading are the days of “pump and pray,” replaced in part by the technological leaps made in the collection and analysis of millions of datapoints. With these datapoints, it is now possible to recreate the subsurface to better visualize the movement of fluid, the length of fractures and more.

With the commercialization of sealed wellbore pressure monitoring (SWPM), completions engineers can monitor fracture growth and the fluid volumes between treated wells by tracking the pressure response in a nonperforated wellbore. As fractures approach the sealed wellbore, a pressure response is generated. Engineers are able to use the response to determine fluid volumes quickly using pressure gauges mounted at the surface.

Cover Story:
ESG
ESG takes root typography
There’s little doubt sustainability will be part of doing business in oil and gas fields going forward. Now, how do companies go about quantifying their efforts?
Len Vermillion, Editorial Director
R

iddle us this: what comes first, the E, the S or the G?

The answer of course is the E. Wait, maybe it’s the S. It might just be the G when you really think about it.

Precisely.

No one agrees as to how one leads to the others, but everyone agrees the three common factors of measuring sustainability—environmental impact, social responsibility and corporate governance—are sure to be part of doing business this year, next year and beyond.

But that’s only if you want investors to like you, customers to choose you, other companies to work with you, and politicians to, well, leave you alone.

Just kidding, we know that last one will never happen.

But ESG is happening. Have you listened to an oil and gas company’s earnings call lately? ESG reporting has moved from an afterthought at the end to a highlight at the beginning. Companies large and small—operators and service providers—are releasing separate sustainability reports in more frequency.

ESG takes root typography
There’s little doubt sustainability will be part of doing business in oil and gas fields going forward. Now, how do companies go about quantifying their efforts?
Len Vermillion, Editorial Director
R

iddle us this: what comes first, the E, the S or the G?

The answer of course is the E. Wait, maybe it’s the S. It might just be the G when you really think about it.

Precisely.

No one agrees as to how one leads to the others, but everyone agrees the three common factors of measuring sustainability—environmental impact, social responsibility and corporate governance—are sure to be part of doing business this year, next year and beyond.

But that’s only if you want investors to like you, customers to choose you, other companies to work with you, and politicians to, well, leave you alone.

Just kidding, we know that last one will never happen.

But ESG is happening. Have you listened to an oil and gas company’s earnings call lately? ESG reporting has moved from an afterthought at the end to a highlight at the beginning. Companies large and small—operators and service providers—are releasing separate sustainability reports in more frequency.

Image of By the Numbers Carbon emissions and ESG
Image of By the Numbers Carbon emissions and ESG
Image of Icon
Image of ESG-mandated assets
Image of Arrow Down
The amount of CO2 emissions from all U.S. energy sources has declined by 14% since 2010.
ESG-mandated assets:
In 2018 ESG-mandated assets made up 26% ($12 trillion) of all managed assets in the U.S. It is projected to be 50% ($34.5 trillion) in 2025.
The amount of CO2 emissions per capita in the U.S. has declined from 17.3 tCO2 to 15 tCO2 since 2010.
Total U.S. renewable energy consumption has increased by 56.3% since 2010.
Image of Arrow Up
Fossil fuels were the source of 75% of total U.S. human-caused greenhouse-gas emissions in 2018.
Image of Graph
Image of Cloud
Carbon emissions from U.S. fossil fuel and cement production has declined by 9.7% since 2000.
59% of energy and industrial sector executives identified digital technologies that improve energy efficiency as a technology priority for a low-carbon future.
Image of ESG-mandated assets
ESG-mandated assets:
In 2018 ESG-mandated assets made up 26% ($12 trillion) of all managed assets in the U.S. It is projected to be 50% ($34.5 trillion) in 2025.
Image of Icon
Image of Arrow Down The amount of CO2 emissions from all U.S. energy sources has declined by 14% since 2010.
The amount of CO2 emissions per capita in the U.S. has declined from 17.3 tCO2 to 15 tCO2 since 2010.
Image of Arrow Up Total U.S. renewable energy consumption has increased by 56.3% since 2010.
Image of Cloud
Carbon emissions from U.S. fossil fuel and cement production has declined by 9.7% since 2000.
Fossil fuels were the source of 75% of total U.S. human-caused greenhouse-gas emissions in 2018.
Image of Graph
59% of energy and industrial sector executives identified digital technologies that improve energy efficiency as a technology priority for a low-carbon future.
Image of Illustration
(Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, International Energy Agency
and Deloitte Insights; data compiled by Brian Walzel; design by Melissa Ritchie)
Innovation Spotlight
The future of additive manufacturing
The Siemens Energy AM Monitor’s machine learning algorithms impartially evaluate the recoating during the printing of a 3D-printed component.
Ariana Hurtado, Senior Managing Editor
A

dditive manufacturing (AM) involves the technologies that build 3D objects by adding layer upon layer of material (e.g., plastic, metal or concrete), and the process involves making objects from 3D model data.

In this exclusive Q&A with E&P Plus, Andreas Graichen, group manager for digitalization and industrialization of additive manufacturing with Siemens Energy, discusses the Siemens AM Monitor—a 2020 Offshore Technology Conference Spotlight on New Technology award winner.

Analyst Corner
People looking forward graphic
Looking ahead to a post-pandemic gas market
Although some demand may be permanently lost, the gas market is still expected to follow a growth path.
People looking forward graphic
Kristy Kramer, Wood Mackenzie
A

s the world grapples with the dreadful human cost of COVID-19, the global economy is also coming to terms with the scale of the pandemic. While the impact on oil markets was swift and dramatic, the gas and LNG sectors have also been hit hard by coronavirus.

Even before the coronavirus pandemic, oil price crash and ensuing economic upheaval, 2020 was already shaping up to be one of oversupply for global gas markets. Last year was a record year for new capacity additions, with nearly 40 MMtonnes of supply added in 2019—supply that was poised to put downward pressure on prices in 2020.

The events of early 2020 are impacting the gas market this year. The impact on gas demand was immediate as countries around the world went into lockdown. However, as restrictions loosen, demand is already showing signs of recovery.

Reservoir Testing
Reservoir Testing
Bringing new levels
of flexibility to well
testing operations
Live downhole reservoir testing enables dynamic data acquisition
in Asia, the Middle East, North Sea and Africa.
Carlos Merino and Bryan Zimdars, Schlumberger
D

ynamic reservoir data are a key enabler for oil and gas operators to prove reserves and maximize hydrocarbon recovery. However, traditional well testing approaches, where a job is planned, executed and interpreted in a linear fashion, can limit operators from obtaining the optimal amount of data during the well test. Furthermore, this approach is inefficient and rigid, significantly increasing the time operators spend between acquiring data and making key field development decisions.

For many decades, the linear well testing approach remained unchanged until the introduction of wireless telemetry about 10 years ago. Wireless telemetry enables acoustic data to be transmitted across downhole repeaters from the downhole gauges to surface in real time. Prior to this innovation, the only way to gather real-time data was through a wireline deployment during the drillstem test (DST), which increases risk and cost.

Drilling Automation
In this exclusive video interview, Paul Madero discusses the importance of technologies.
drilling
Baker Hughes VP
of drilling: remote
drilling is here to stay
Paul Madero explains why remote and autonomous drilling
operations will enable better wells and better production.
Brian Walzel, Senior Editor
R

emote and automated drilling capabilities are nothing new for the oil and gas industry. Its roots can be traced back more than 20 years, but adoption has accelerated with the evolution of digital and machine learning technologies throughout the past decade.

Now, with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, remote operations are playing an increasingly important role in the industry. In this exclusive video interview with E&P Plus, Paul Madero, vice president of drilling services with Baker Hughes, discusses why these technologies are so important in the oil and gas industry today.

Drawdown Optimization
Drawdown
management in
unconventional
reservoirs
Darryl Tompkins, Revo Testing Technologies
A real-time workflow evaluates flowback data and improves well performance.
N

ow more than ever, operators are focused on methods of improving well performance to reduce costs and increase production. Much of that improvement is centered on well spacing, completion designs and surface efficiency. Drawdown management during the IP period—or flowback—is an often overlooked means of improving well performance. The data collected during this early-time flowback period offers one of the first glimpses of valuable information that helps to evaluate well performance and reservoir responses.

Many operators tend to either flow wells too aggressively or too conservatively. This approach is often derived from rules of thumb or simplified diagnostics that fail to capture the true effects of drawdown on well performance. A real-time workflow must be used to evaluate flowback data to optimize the drawdown strategy so operators can maximize the production of each well, in the shortest amount of time, all without damaging the reservoir or completion.

Drawdown Optimization
Drawdown
management in
unconventional
reservoirs
Darryl Tompkins, Revo Testing Technologies
A real-time workflow evaluates flowback data and improves well performance.
N

ow more than ever, operators are focused on methods of improving well performance to reduce costs and increase production. Much of that improvement is centered on well spacing, completion designs and surface efficiency. Drawdown management during the IP period—or flowback—is an often overlooked means of improving well performance. The data collected during this early-time flowback period offers one of the first glimpses of valuable information that helps to evaluate well performance and reservoir responses.

Many operators tend to either flow wells too aggressively or too conservatively. This approach is often derived from rules of thumb or simplified diagnostics that fail to capture the true effects of drawdown on well performance. A real-time workflow must be used to evaluate flowback data to optimize the drawdown strategy so operators can maximize the production of each well, in the shortest amount of time, all without damaging the reservoir or completion.

Diverless Technology
Diverless Technology
Enhanced capability
for single well step-outs
and tiebacks
Subsea connection advances facilitate diverless shallow-water tieback.
Robert McWilliams, AFGlobal UK
N

ovel use of diverless connections in construction of a shallow subsea tieback offshore Malaysia cut costs by approximately 20% while improving safety and reducing the project’s carbon footprint. A key project component was a Stinger Deployed Diverless Connector (SDDC) developed in a partnership between AFGlobal and pipeline contractor Cortez Subsea.

Deployed as part of Vestigo Petroleum’s Tembikai Non-Associated Gas (TNAG) field development program, the project integrated new and proven technology to connect the pipeline to two flexible risers and to connect pipeline sections without the need for divers and welding. AFGlobal and Cortez Subsea developed the SDDC system to connect the pipeline to the host facility.

Powering the Oil Field
Powering the Oil Field
The business case for
oilfield electrification
Electrification opens a world of opportunity to improve operations,
including lower LOE, de-risking, ESG benefits and more.
Joshua W. Evans, P.E., Burns & McDonnell
O

il and gas production and delivery to midstream refiners consumes significant amounts of energy in the form of onsite generation and utilization of equipment fueled primarily by diesel or natural gas. The costs associated with this energy routinely rank as a top LOE for operators. As producers look for options to reduce costs, energy-related LOE offers an opportunity for significant savings through conversion to electrical power or improvements to existing electrical infrastructure.

Reducing LOE can often be accomplished while achieving other benefits, such as reductions in greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions, improved resiliency and all-around de-risking of operations.

Digital Solutions
Realizing the value of data in oil and gas
With integrated analytics operationalized and simplified at scale, energy companies can adopt a true data-driven approach.
Niall O’Doherty, Teradata
T

echnology often drives industry disruption and is a foundational element to support and react to any changes in the business. But for industries experiencing the ripple effects of disruption brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic this year, adopting advanced technologies and a digital-first strategy have become critical for many companies to merely survive.

While energy organizations were among the first to adopt digitization, Deloitte emphasized in a recent report that many are now taking the necessary next steps to embrace the power of analytics, collect and integrate troves of HSE and security (HSSE), operations, supply chain and finance data, as they recognize the opportunity to make their “$3.4 trillion asset base smarter and more efficient.”

Operator Solutions
Improving recovery in natural gas wells with artificial lift
Downhole compressor technology drives adoption of artificial lift for natural gas wells.
Herman Artinian, Upwing Energy
I

t would be no exaggeration to say that artificial lift has made a tremendous contribution to increased production in oil fields. More than 50% of oil wells use artificial lift techniques, such as pumps and injection methods, to boost production. It is estimated that the artificial lift equipment market amounts to almost $10 billion annually, enabling $800 billion of oil production per year.

Despite these impressive results in the oil segment, artificial lift has gained relatively little traction in gas wells, both conventional and unconventional. This is largely because until now there have been no artificial lift tools that can directly induce energy into the gas to increase production and recoverability. While operators have been able to get positive results using wellhead compressors, experience has shown that these devices can accelerate liquid loading, especially in unconventional wells, due to higher critical lifting velocity and lower production fluid density within the wellbore. The result is decreasing productivity and premature abandonment.

Hart Energy Industry Voice logo
SPONSORED CONTENT
Higher natural gas prices lift producers’ spirits
DUG Haynesville virtual program offers well-timed insights
N

atural gas producers along the Texas-Louisiana border will play leading roles in the upstream sector’s recovery from the depths of its 2020 market disruptions. That positive news ranks as a key takeaway from the FundamentalEdge report published Sept. 9 by data services leader Enverus.

Producers nationwide dramatically trimmed 2020 spending plans as commodity prices fell alongside dropping demand, one notable result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Rig activity was cut and production declined nationwide as oversupply overtook the market, particularly in oil-directed plays. In turn, associated gas production dropped – and the so-called “dry gas plays” made up the difference as natural gas prices rose to multi-year highs this summer.

South America icon
Regional Report
South America
South America’s pending success to overshadow harsh 2020
Upstream activity will fuel the region as a leader on the road to recovery.
Mary Holcomb, Associate Editor
A

s the oil and gas industry continues to weather the storm of the downturn, South America’s upstream sector is preparing for a wave of new growth and opportunity.

Across the globe, operators have slashed capex and reduced activity after the worst price crash in decades wreaked havoc on the sector. The current state of the market has put the U.S., Europe and Africa in a dire state, offsetting a potential 2021 recovery by two or more years.

Although the outlook for the sector remains uncertain, South America is expected to lead the recovery among regions given its attractive onshore and offshore prospects, the political resolve in Guyana and Argentina’s hydrocarbon production, according to Wood Mackenzie analysts.

Tech Watch
Smart glasses provide
immersive experience
Onsite technicians can send, receive, or open and view documents on smart glasses as well as receive real-time expertise, which reduces downtime and HSEQ risks.
Stephanie Hertzog, Sodexo Energy & Resources – North America
A

ugmented reality (AR) is having a transformative impact on the oil industry, especially now during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is playing an evolving role in managing critical asset malfunctions and breakdowns on remote sites while assisting in maintaining social distancing through audio/visual-based virtual communication.

Asset management
The oil industry is asset-intensive, and downtime presents major challenges. Whether on land, offshore or in deep water, remote and oftentimes hostile locations make managing assets logistically complicated. Keeping qualified staff is harder, and downtime is costly and can develop into HSEQ issues.
Tech Trends
The latest technologies emerging in the upstream oil and gas industry
Companies collaborate to create 2D, 3D real-time well visualization
Weatherford International Plc announced a collaboration with INT, an upstream data visualization provider, to offer real-time well visualization in both 2D and 3D. Weatherford will embed INT’s IVAAP framework into the Weatherford Centro digital well delivery software, advancing its data visualization capabilities. The digital well delivery software offers workflows that integrate every element of an operator’s well data, allowing team members from any global location to access, share and store all vital project information at any time.
Technology can help speed soil recovery after oil spills

After an oil spill or leak, it is important to act fast. If the oil has gotten into soil, scientists need to rapidly assess how much oil there is and how far it has spread. It is a costly and time-consuming process. A team at University of Nebraska-Lincoln found a new method using technology called Vis-NIR spectroscopy that is faster and cheaper.

Alliance provides integrated, open architecture software to maximize asset potential
Halliburton and Honeywell announced a collaboration to maximize asset potential, reduce execution risk and lower the total cost of ownership for oil and gas operators. The collaboration will leverage Halliburton Landmark’s DecisionSpace 365 E&P cloud applications and the Honeywell Forge industrial analytics software to deliver insights about oil and gas assets. Together, the companies bring deep domain expertise in subsurface and surface operations with the latest digital innovations to help operators address operational efficiency, asset productivity and risk across their business. Operators will be able to maximize asset value by creating a digital twin on an integrated and open architecture that connects and models the supply chain from reservoir to point of sale. They will also be able to increase production, minimize opex/capex and reduce operational risks by streamlining processes from downhole to surface controls, including digital solutions for improved subsurface insight. Additionally, the collaboration can offer optimization of total asset and enterprise performance using real-time monitoring and remote operations.
US Highlights
Us Highlights October 2020 Map
1
Wyoming

Results from a Niobrara well were announced by Samson Resources Co. The 34-3031 39-74 NH Allemand Fed initially flowed 2,413 bbl of 49°API oil, with 4.375 MMcf of gas and 1,224 bbl or water per day. The Hornbuckle Field was drilled in Section 30-39n-74w in Converse County, Wyo., to 22,326 ft (12,207 ft true vertical depth). It was tested after 47-stage fracturing with a shut-in casing pressure of 3,000 psi during testing on a 28/64-inch choke. Production is from a perforated zone at 12,298 ft to 22,061 ft.

2
North Dakota

An Upper Three Forks venture in Dunn County, N.D., initially flowed 5,172 bbl of 41°API oil, 3.785 MMcf of gas and 4,884 bbl of water per day. Marathon Oil Co.’s Ritter 34-12TFH well was drilled in Section 12-146n-94w. The Bailey Field discovery was drilled to 21,287 ft (10,761 ft true vertical depth) and produces from perforations at 11,114 ft to 21,154 ft. Gauged on a 64/64-inch choke, the flowing casing pressure was 1,200 psi.

3
New Mexico

A Wolfcamp well in Eddy County, N.M., was tested flowing 4,544 bbl of oil, 10.925 MMcf of gas and 9,581 bbl of water per day. Oxy USA Inc.’s Corral Fly 35-26 Federal Com 036H is in Section 2-25s-29e. The Purple Sage Field well was drilled to 20,483 ft (10,364 ft true vertical depth). Tested on a 37/64-inch choke, the shut-in casing pressure was 1,600 psi, and production is from a perforated zone at 10,537 ft to 20,387 ft.

International Highlights
International Highlights World Map Image
1
Guyana

Exxon Mobil announced two additional reservoirs in the Stabroek Block offshore Guyana. The additional reservoirs are adjacent to and southeast of the Yellowtail Field discovery well. According to partner Hess Corp., these are the 17th and 18th oil discoveries on the block. The new findings increase the recoverable resource base to more than 8 Bboe. The most recent well, Yellowtail-2, was drilled about 1 mile southeast of Yellowtail-1 to appraise its size, and it found the two new discoveries adjacent to the discovery reservoir and below it. Drilling operations were recently suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but operations are continuing at exploration well Redtail-1, which is northwest of Yellowtail-1. The reported net production from the Liza Field averaged 22,000 bbl/d of oil in the second quarter of 2020, but the field hit 120,000 bbl/d in the third quarter after the commissioning of water injection equipment and bringing gas injection fully online

2
Suriname

A discovery was reported in offshore Suriname’s Block 58 by Apache Corp. The Kwaskwasi-1 well was drilled to 6,645 m and hit 278 m of net oil and volatile oil/gas condensate pay in multiple stacked targets in Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Santonian intervals. The shallower Campanian interval contained 63 m of net oil pay and 86 m of net volatile oil/gas condensate pay. Samples indicate between 34°API and 43°API oil. The deeper Santonian interval contains 129 m of net hydrocarbon reservoir. After completion operations are done at Kwaskwasi-1, the rig will be moved to drill Keskesi East-1. Apache has identified at least seven distinct play types and more than 50 prospects within the thermally mature play fairway.

On The Move
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Illustration of person moving up in clouds
PEOPLE
Girish K. Saligram headshot
Saligram

Weatherford International Plc has selected Girish K. Saligram, previously COO at Exterran Corp., as its next president and CEO. Saligram’s appointment, which includes a seat on the Weatherford board, takes effect Oct. 12. The top position has been vacant since early June following the resignation of former CEO Mark A. McCollum.

Hurricane Energy Plc has appointed Antony Maris CEO and executive director.

GoExpedi, an e-commerce, supply chain and analytics company, has named Noel Connolly senior vice president of digital strategy.

The Plaza Group, an international petrochemical marketing firm, has promoted Jose Flores to executive vice president.

BCCK Holding Co., a provider of in engineering, procurement, fabrication and field construction services, has appointed Thai Pham, P.E. senior process engineer. Pham will be located in BCCK’s office in The Woodlands, Texas, and will be responsible for supporting proposals and technology developments across the company.

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darrin west

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Last Word
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The intersection of sustainability and digital
Meeting the challenge of sustainable operations requires embracing innovation and driving high performance.
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Lees Rodionov, Schlumberger
D

emand from the global community for our industry to employ a more sustainable method of providing access to energy continues to grow. While the global pandemic prompted a drastic change in the way we work, our industry was already undergoing a significant transformation. We have been working to answer the global call to action introduced by the U.N. with the Sustainable Development Goals. We have moved beyond simply meeting an expectation—we are committed to building sustainable operations across the entire E&P value chain.

Meeting this challenge requires embracing innovation and driving high performance, and doing so more safely and sustainably than in years past. Schlumberger is focused on creating technology that unlocks access to energy in this new environment. Customer centricity, digital enablement and sustainability are all elements of our strategy. We see the intersection of the three as an opportunity to steer a transformational change to our industry’s operational footprint.

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