E+P Plus logo
Will big data shape recovery?
Companies are rethinking data
analytics to navigate uncertainties
Black plus
Q&A with Hinda Gharbi
Read Energy Transition
Operator Spotlight: Haynesbille E&P
Regional Report: Southeast Asia
November 2020
E+P Plus logo
Will big data shape recovery?
Companies are rethinking data
analytics to navigate uncertainties
Black plus
Q&A with Hinda Gharbi
Read Energy Transition
Operator Spotlight: Haynesbille E&P
Regional Report: Southeast Asia
November 2020
A Hart Energy Publication
Hart Energy logo
E+P Plus logo
November 2020 + Vol. 95 + Issue 11
Plus
Plus
Plus
Predictable Production
Offshore Facilities
Image of Collaboration leads
Predictable Production
Offshore Facilities
About The Cover: As the oil and gas industry struggles to recover from a historic downturn, energy companies are revisiting data analytics for resilience and recovery. (Background cover photo courtesy of Marc Morrison/marcmorrison.com; Cover design by Melissa Ritchie; Bottom images from left to right courtesy of Schlumberger, korsart/Shutterstock.com; Goodrich Petroleum; and Shutterstock.com)
Coming Next Month: The December cover story will focus on the major U.S. shale plays with a theme of “the good, the bad and the future.” The Executive Q&A will feature an exclusive video interview with Scott Gale, executive director with Halliburton Labs. This issue will also highlight coverage of ADIPEC 2020 Virtual. The Regional Report will cover the Caribbean Sea. As always, E&P Plus will include its exploration, drilling, completions, production and offshore features in every issue. While you’re waiting for your next copy of E&P Plus, be sure to visit HartEnergy.com for the latest news, industry updates and unique industry analysis.
E&P Plus (ISSN 1527-4063) (PM40036185) is published monthly by Hart Energy Publishing, LP, 1616 S. Voss Road, Suite 1000, Houston, Texas 77057. Advertising rates furnished upon request. All subscriber inquiries should be addressed to E&P Plus, 1616 S. Voss Road, Suite 1000, Houston, TX 77057; Telephone: 713-260-6442, Fax: 713-840-1449; custserv@hartenergy.com. Copyright © Hart Energy Publishing, LP, 2020. Hart Energy Publishing, LP reserves all rights to editorial matter. No article may be reproduced or transmitted in whole or in parts by any means without written permission of the publisher. Federal copyright law prohibits unauthorized reproduction by any means and imposes fines of up to $25,000 for violations.
EPPlus logo white
1616 S. Voss Road, ste 1000
houston, Texas 77057

P: +1 713.260.6400 F: +1 713.840.0923
HartEnergy.com
Editorial Director
Len Vermillion

lvermillion@hartenergy.com

Group Senior Editor
Velda Addison

vaddison@hartenergy.com

Senior Editor
Brian Walzel

bwalzel@hartenergy.com

Senior Editor
Darren Barbee

dbarbee@hartenergy.com

Senior Editor
Joseph Markman

jmarkman@hartenergy.com

Activity Editor
Larry Prado

lprado@hartenergy.com

Associate Editors

Mary Holcomb
mholcomb@hartenergy.com

Faiza Rizvi
frizvi@hartenergy.com

Editor-at-Large
Nissa Darbonne

ndarbonne@hartenergy.com

Senior Managing Editor, Publications
Ariana Hurtado

ahurtado@hartenergy.com

Senior Managing Editor, Digital Media
Emily Patsy

epatsy@hartenergy.com

Assistant Managing Editor
Bill Walter

bwalter@hartenergy.com

Creative Director
Alexa Sanders

asanders@hartenergy.com

Art Director
Melissa Ritchie

mritchie@hartenergy.com

Publisher
Darrin West

dwest@hartenergy.com

Hart Energy full logo
Senior Vice President of Digital
Chief Digital Officer
MARK CHILES
Senior Vice President, Media, E&P/Conferences
Russell Laas
Chief Financial Officer
Chris Arndt
Chief Executive Officer
Richard A. Eichler
Hart Energy logo
Online Content +
Exclusives Available Only Online
Oil rig in harbor
Experts ‘cautiously optimistic’ about Africa oil, gas exploration
By Velda Addison, Group Senior Editor
More licensing rounds and ending lengthy regulatory delays could lead to more exploration investment for Africa’s oil and gas sector, experts said during a recent panel moderated by the African Energy Chamber.
U.S. Energy Development CEO shares insight on shale pursuits
By Velda Addison, Group Senior Editor
The private independent is actively pursuing partnerships and funding development drilling in U.S. shale plays as market conditions improve. “We look at over 300 deals on an annual basis, and this year’s been no exception,” Jordan Jayson, CEO of U.S. Energy Development Corp., told Hart Energy.
Experts: China replaces Middle East as top US energy challenge
By Joseph Markman, Senior Editor
China’s oil and gas import market, and its growing antagonism, will be issues to grapple with for years, experts said during a KPMG webinar.
VIRTUAL CONFERENCES
ON DEMAND
Hart Energy’s DUG conferences are the
fastest, easiest and safest way for you to
stream relevant market intelligence on
dynamic regions directly to your desk—no
matter where your desk is today. Start streaming
these free conference sessions on demand:

HART ENERGY VIDEOS
By Jessica Morales, Director of Video Content
Kongsberg Digital president discusses digital twin, Shell partnership
Hege Skryseth, president of Kongsberg Digital, sat down with Hart Energy’s Emily Patsy and Mary Holcomb to discuss leveraging digital technologies in the oil and gas industry plus the company’s latest partnership with Shell.
Hege Skryseth, Emily Patsy and Mary Holcomb on a zoom call
Oil & Gas Asset Clearinghouse CEO Cody Davis discusses A&D outlook, live auction
Cody Davis and Jessica Morales on zoom call
Cody Davis, CEO of Oil & Gas Asset Clearinghouse, recently joined Hart Energy’s Jessica Morales to discuss A&D activity and also provided a preview of this year’s first live oil and gas asset auction.
SEG Session Chair Bill Abriel on the business of geophysics
Bill Abriel, the BAG session chair and former SEG president, recently joined Hart Energy’s Faiza Rizvi to discuss the first-ever all-virtual SEG Annual Meeting plus the importance of geophysics in the changing business climate of the oil and gas services sector.
Range Resources SVP talks being a leader among us shale producers on ESG
K. Scott Roy and Len Vermillion on zoom call
K. Scott Roy, senior vice president of Range Resources, recently joined Hart Energy’s Len Vermillion to discuss the U.S. shale producer’s net-zero ambitions and its outlook on natural gas in the energy transition.
Texas-based Jasper Ventures provides look ahead
Brent Jasper, president of Jasper Ventures, recently joined Hart Energy’s Jessica Morales to discuss how his family-owned business has weathered multiple oil and gas downturns while still serving the midstream business for nearly 30 years.
As I See It text
Carbon capture, utilisation and storage
The urgent need for CCUS
With financial resources dwindling, companies must prioritize GHG-reduction efforts.
A

mong the multitude of technologies and methods designed to reduce greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions, carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) is emerging as the one the oil and gas industry is putting its collective weight behind.

Major oil companies like Occidental Petroleum, Shell and Equinor have implemented CCUS technologies to different degrees. The Oil and Gas Climate Initiative (OGCI), which counts bp, Chevron, Repsol, Total and Exxon Mobil among its members, launched its KickStarter program in 2019, which facilitates large-scale commercial investment in CCUS. The OGCI holds a $1 billion-plus investment fund for CCUS projects.

The synergies between CCUS and oil and gas production are plentiful. Carbon is a major component of ESG efforts, and capturing carbon can be relatively inexpensive. In fact, putting an emphasis on carbon capture isn’t just environmentally friendly; it might be imperative.

In the company’s October newsletter, Ryder Scott said, “The financial health of the oil and gas industry may depend on it.”

Brian Walzel Headhsot
Brian Walzel
Guest Column text
Energy transition requires solutions from the oil & gas industry
Energy transition
Achieving further success toward a lower carbon future will continue to require major investments of time, money and ingenuity.
Energy transition
Energy transition requires solutions from the oil & gas industry
Achieving further success toward a lower carbon future will continue to require major investments of time, money and ingenuity.
T

he world’s next energy transformation is underway, and transitioning to a lower carbon future will require ingenuity from all sectors of the energy industry. While renewable energy will continue to move us toward these goals, much of the innovation required will come from the oil and gas (O&G) industry, with its history of scaling technological solutions to meet the world’s energy demand.

The transition is not about replacing one form of energy with another; it is about the entire energy ecosystem collaborating to power the world in the cleanest, most efficient and affordable ways possible. This is a transition all Americans can get behind, from oilfield workers in West Texas to solar installation technicians in California.

The O&G industry comprises engineers, data scientists, geologists, parents, grandparents, men, women and people of all races and backgrounds who care about the environment and want the best for future generations. Excluding this expertise wastes a major driver of energy industry solutions. We can provide the energy the world needs now, while making it cleaner and safer by using technology to reduce emissions and improve efficiency.

Executive Q&A
Video icon
Q&A text
Schlumberger’s Hinda Gharbi believes shifting industry trends have only accelerated this year
In this exclusive video clip for Hart Energy, Schlumberger’s Hinda Gharbi details the dynamics of the path forward for the oil and gas industry.
Schlumberger’s Hinda Gharbi believes shifting industry trends have only accelerated this year
Efficiency, responsiveness, innovation and digitalization are among the factors that will shape the future of the oil and gas industry.
Len Vermillion, Editorial Director

E

ven before the COVID-19 pandemic hit, Hinda Gharbi, executive vice president of service and equipment with Schlumberger, said the company was already focused on changing industry dynamics. Priorities were being shifted within the industry, and operators and service companies alike had begun to shift their long-term plans.

“With the current pandemic, we believe these trends have only accelerated,” she said in an exclusive video interview for E&P Plus.

Operator Spotlight
Goodrich Petroleum president and COO details company’s plans
Confidence in gas prices and low service costs solidify the Haynesville E&P’s 2021 operations.
Brian Walzel, Senior Editor

W

hile the oil and gas industry might be hard-pressed to find many bright spots in 2020, the recovery of natural gas prices, and subsequently the role of gas producers, can be one of them. Among those that are riding the natural gas wave is Goodrich Petroleum. Goodrich, primarily focused on the Haynesville Shale, produces 138,000 Mcfe/d largely from its approximate 24,000 net Haynesville acres. Historically low service costs and stable Henry Hub price points are allowing Goodrich to set its goals on top-tier growth and the potential for free cash flow in 2021.

Goodrich President and COO Robert Turnham recently provided an exclusive interview with E&P Plus where he discussed in more detail the company’s plans for the remainder of the year and into 2021. He also touched on the company’s well completion strategy and how to position itself amid volatile times in the oil and gas industry.

Hart Energy Industry Voice logo
SPONSORED CONTENT
Fundamental chemistry and methodology proves successful in preventing polymer induced agglomerations — (“GOO”)
K. MacEwen, K. Hoeman and J. Dawson, Innospec Inc. Oilfield Services
F

or years, operators in iron-rich mineral basins, such as Woodford/Cana, Delaware and portions of the Eagleford have struggled with a rubbery-like substance adhering to surface treating equipment, accompanied with lost production. As a chemical company and a solutions provider, Innospec’s Oilfield Services Stimulation R&T group, with their knowledge and experience of FR chemistry, wanted to not only treat the issue, but to fundamentally understand the cause of the issue. The solution came about only by surmounting some major scientific obstacles—obstacles tackled by many, but all without long-term successful resolution of the issue.

In the fracturing industry, it is common to use synthetic friction reducers (FRs) to overcome the high friction pressures associated with pumping large water volumes at high rates. The physical form of the FR is either invert emulsion, suspension or dry powder. However, regardless of the FR form, the chemistry of the polymer is critical. The chemistry of most common frac FRs is either anionic or cationic polyacrylamide co-polymers (see Scheme 1).

Cover Story:
Data Analytics
Will Big Data Shape Recovery? green and white typography
In the midst of a historic disruption with remote operations becoming the new normal, oil and gas companies are rethinking Big Data analytics to navigate the uncertainties of the industry’s post-pandemic future.
Faiza Rizvi, Associate Editor
A

round this time last year, oil and gas executives were contemplating how Big Data analytics could become a source of significant competitive advantage for their companies. As the industry made slow, yet steady progress toward digital transformation, corporate discussions centered on how machine learning (ML), artificial intelligence (AI) and automation could save the upstream sector billions of dollars.

Fast forward to today, the industry is knee-deep in one of the worst downturns in history. The demand destruction has caused massive well shut-ins, historic layoffs and, consequently, remote operations have become the new normal. The executives are now discussing survival strategies using advanced digital solutions and are revisiting the use of historical data for resilience and recovery.

A recent study by McKinsey & Co. stated, “It is uncertain when the current perfect storm impacting oil and gas operators will pass…What is certain, however, is that only innovative operators with superior operating models will come out of this crisis prepared to cope with volatility and to sustain future growth.”

Will Big Data Shape Recovery? green and white typography
In the midst of a historic disruption with remote operations becoming the new normal, oil and gas companies are rethinking Big Data analytics to navigate the uncertainties of the industry’s post-pandemic future.
Faiza Rizvi, Associate Editor
A

round this time last year, oil and gas executives were contemplating how Big Data analytics could become a source of significant competitive advantage for their companies. As the industry made slow, yet steady progress toward digital transformation, corporate discussions centered on how machine learning (ML), artificial intelligence (AI) and automation could save the upstream sector billions of dollars.

Fast forward to today, the industry is knee-deep in one of the worst downturns in history. The demand destruction has caused massive well shut-ins, historic layoffs and, consequently, remote operations have become the new normal. The executives are now discussing survival strategies using advanced digital solutions and are revisiting the use of historical data for resilience and recovery.

A recent study by McKinsey & Co. stated, “It is uncertain when the current perfect storm impacting oil and gas operators will pass…What is certain, however, is that only innovative operators with superior operating models will come out of this crisis prepared to cope with volatility and to sustain future growth.”

Image of By the Numbers Big Data in oil and gas
Image of By the Numbers Big Data in oil and gas
80,000 sensors

15 petabytes of data

Illustration
Modern offshore drilling platforms have about 80,000 sensors, which generate 15 petabytes of data during the life of the asset.
Advanced analytics can yield returns up to 30 to 50 times of the investment within a few months of implementation.
43% of oil and gas executives surveyed identified the increasing availability of Big Data analytics as one of the top three trends that will positively impact their company’s business growth in the next three years.
Production data from Equinor’s Volve Field consisted of approximately 40,000 files, with the entire dataset consisting of 4,206 gigabytes.
A rig schedule is reworked as much as 75% of the time due to a lack of proper data integration.
Photo of Graph Big Data analytics could lead to production improvements by 6% to 8%.
Image of Data
Image of Dollar Sign The value of the global oil and gas market with Big Data could reach nearly $11 billion by 2026.
80,000 sensors

15 petabytes of data

Illustration
Modern offshore drilling platforms have about 80,000 sensors, which generate 15 petabytes of data during the life of the asset.
Advanced analytics can yield returns up to 30 to 50 times of the investment within a few months of implementation.
43% of oil and gas executives surveyed identified the increasing availability of Big Data analytics as one of the top three trends that will positively impact their company’s business growth in the next three years.
Production data from Equinor’s Volve Field consisted of approximately 40,000 files, with the entire dataset consisting of 4,206 gigabytes.
A rig schedule is reworked as much as 75% of the time due to a lack of proper data integration.
Photo of Graph Big Data analytics could lead to production improvements by 6% to 8%.
Image of Data
Image of Dollar Sign
The value of the global oil and gas market with Big Data could reach nearly $11 billion by 2026.
(Source: Bain & Co., McKinsey & Co., EY, Market Reports, IEEE; data compiled by Brian Walzel; design by Melissa Ritchie)
Industry Pulse
Challenges facing budding US offshore wind sector
Policy and permitting, the environment and metocean conditions, and infrastructure were among the topics discussed at the virtual OTC event as companies aim to advance projects.
Velda Addison, Group Senior Editor
W

ith more than 2,000 GW of technical wind resource potential, the winds over open waters off the U.S. are capable of producing about twice the generating capacity of all U.S. electric power plants combined, according to the Department of Energy.

However, tapping part of that will require overcoming challenges—seen as opportunities by offshore wind energy players—for the budding U.S. offshore wind sector. During the recently held Offshore Technology Conference (OTC) virtual event, executives and regulators involved in offshore wind discussed projects underway and what is needed to bring such projects to fruition as the world moves toward cleaner forms of energy.

Challenges faced include policy and permitting, the environment and metocean conditions, and infrastructure.

World View
Eyeing exploration opportunity in Ghana
The West African country is depending on seismic data to gain more knowledge on basins and attract investors.
Guinea flag with oil drilling graphics
Velda Addison, Group Senior Editor
Guinea flag with oil drilling graphics
T

he waters offshore Ghana have already given rise to the giant Jubilee oil field, where Kosmos Energy detected an overlooked Upper Cretaceous structural-stratigraphic play concept in the Tano Basin.

The 2007 discovery opened the door to a new hydrocarbon province, putting the West African country on the map. More oil and gas finds followed, including the TEN fields along with the Sankofa, Gye and Nyame fields. Companies such as Exxon Mobil Corp. have since joined a list of explorers that includes Kosmos Energy, Tullow Oil and Eni SpA.

“It took a while for companies to see that and convince themselves that the deepwater [offshore Ghana] has potential,” said Michael Aryeetey, exploration and appraisal manager with the Ghana National Petroleum Corp. (GNPC), referring to activity following Jubilee.

Analyst Corner
Energy transition: threading the regulatory needle
The oil and gas industry needs to position itself strategically to attract investments while working to achieve low-carbon goals.
Michael Blankenship, Eric Johnson and Stephanie Sebor, Winston & Strawn
Michael Blankenship headshot
Michael Blankenship
Eric Johnson headshot
Eric Johnson
Stephanie Sebor headshot
Stephanie Sebor

T

he oil and gas industry, particularly the E&P and oilfield services subsectors, have faced significant headwinds over the last few years, most recently with the simultaneous demand destruction resulting from COVID-19 and supply shock from the Saudi Arabia-led price war. These recent events, combined with capital flight out of the industry and demands for capital discipline by remaining investors, have accelerated the push by company stakeholders, regulators and others for energy transition initiatives.

But the energy transition journey will take decades. The industry, as a whole, needs to strategically position itself to remain profitable in oil and gas while concurrently evolving over time to meet the demands of a lower-carbon future. Oil and gas will retain a significant role in the global energy mix, particularly for developing nations. However, in the U.S. and Europe, alternative energy sources will expand and take capital—both financial and human—with them.

Energy Transition
Energy Transition
Advancing hydrogen
in the energy mix
Baker Hughes successfully tests and distributes hydrogen-blended gas turbine.
Brian Walzel, Senior Editor
T

ransitioning to a carbon-neutral industry—as has been the stated goal of supermajors and global service providers alike—is an ambitious task and one that will require a mix of efficient fuels and the innovative technologies to produce those fuels.

Although the use of hydrogen as an alternative fuel to oil and natural gas is nothing new, its application is gaining in popularity as the world seeks new fuel sources. Of the multitude of hydrogen technologies that are either being tested or adopted around the world, Baker Hughes recently announced the successful test and application of the world’s first hydrogen blend turbine for gas networks.

Baker Hughes’ NovaLT12 turbine is powered by a blend of up to 10% hydrogen. The turbine will be installed by next year at Snam’s gas compressor station in Istrana, Italy.

Data Aggregation & Storage
Data Aggregation & Storage
The time to
digitalize is now
It can be an opportunity to reevaluate how a company spends its time and what is influencing its productivity as a business.
Stig Woelstad-Knudsen, Kongsberg Digital
A

s Kongsberg Digital has interacted with customers in the past six months since the pandemic lockdown, the feedback circles around two main points:

  1. Operators would have been better equipped to handle their operations if they had been more digitally mature; and
  2. Workers have embraced digital technology as they experience the benefits directly.

In that sense, 2020 has shown the world’s industries that the time is ripe to start digitalizing.

Drilling Optimization
Drilling Optimization
Collaboration
leads to improved
BHA performance
Extended-reach laterals in the Delaware Basin require robust technological innovation.
Marcus Howell, Patterson-UTI; Jordan Ellington, Matador Resources; and Eric Sonne, Taurex Drill Bits
I

n the evolving pursuit of consistent performance drilling, slim-hole curve-lateral intervals in New Mexico’s Delaware Basin present unique challenges for optimization through both drill bit design and motor performance. The engineering partnership of Matador Resources Co. allowed Patterson-UTI Drilling, MS Directional and Taurex Drill Bits to work jointly to solve these challenges.

Challenge
The need to reduce drilling and completion cycle times along with improving capital efficiency is a consistent theme in the upstream E&P sector.

Polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutter technology has rapidly improved in terms of performance and reliability over the past few years, highlighting some of the reliability concerns in slim-hole tools.

Perforating Technology
Perforating Technology
Boosting SWD well and
producer performance
Propellant-boosted perforating optimizes performance in SWD and producing wells.
JD Schmidt, Enhanced Energetics
P

ropellant-boosted perforating has proven to affordably increase completion and recompletion performance in a wide variety of saltwater disposal (SWD) wells and producers. Advances in integrating propellants with traditional shaped-charge perforating technology have enabled perforating and stimulation operations to be performed in one trip at lower cost than traditional two-step, shoot-and-treat methods. The critical success factor is the adoption of a progressively burning, solid propellant designed to increase penetration, eliminate clogged perforations and overcome near-wellbore damage from compaction caused by traditional shaped-charge perforators.

Drilling Optimization
Boosting SWD well and
producer performance
Propellant-boosted perforating optimizes performance in SWD and producing wells.
JD Schmidt, Enhanced Energetics
P

ropellant-boosted perforating has proven to affordably increase completion and recompletion performance in a wide variety of saltwater disposal (SWD) wells and producers. Advances in integrating propellants with traditional shaped-charge perforating technology have enabled perforating and stimulation operations to be performed in one trip at lower cost than traditional two-step, shoot-and-treat methods. The critical success factor is the adoption of a progressively burning, solid propellant designed to increase penetration, eliminate clogged perforations and overcome near-wellbore damage from compaction caused by traditional shaped-charge perforators.

Predictable Production
Unconventional
rod pumping
Complete, predictable, end-to-end sucker rod control allows successful rod pumping in challenging unconventional and deviated modern wells.
Jonathan Martin, Black Mamba Rod Lift
T

echnological advancements to produce hydrocarbon fluids from the reservoir to the surface has generally been most prevalent in directional drilling. As wells come online, their IP is typically supported by electric submersible pumps or gas-lift technologies, which are relatively unaffected by wellbore geometry. As production rates decline, wells are converted to reciprocating rod lift, understood as the most economical form of producing fluids. Modern, unconventional, directional deviated and horizontal wells bring challenges to industry. The drilling department’s decision-making most often does not have the flexibility to consider lifelong production complications due to wellbore path and design. High deviation, doglegs or changes in direction lead to an increase in failure frequency when on reciprocating rod lift. It is imperative for sucker rod pumping to remain economical and reliable in modern wellbores.

A new manufacturing process led by product design has been commercialized for sucker rod pumping. Material science is paramount to the utilization of this new technology. Black Mamba Rod Lift’s sucker rod stabilizer is marketed as end-to-end sucker rod control for well operators. The Black Mamba, an over-molded helical centralizer, is available for use with traditional steel sucker rods and is rapidly finding its way through the marketplace.

Traditional deviated vertical wells feature doglegs and troublesome geometry farther down the wellbore. These areas are commonly addressed with consumable plastic 4-fin sucker rod guides or centralizers. The guides and centralizers prevent steel-on-steel wear between the rodstring and production tubing.

Predictable Production
Unconventional
rod pumping
Complete, predictable, end-to-end sucker rod control allows successful rod pumping in challenging unconventional and deviated modern wells.
Jonathan Martin, Black Mamba Rod Lift
T

echnological advancements to produce hydrocarbon fluids from the reservoir to the surface has generally been most prevalent in directional drilling. As wells come online, their IP is typically supported by electric submersible pumps or gas-lift technologies, which are relatively unaffected by wellbore geometry. As production rates decline, wells are converted to reciprocating rod lift, understood as the most economical form of producing fluids. Modern, unconventional, directional deviated and horizontal wells bring challenges to industry. The drilling department’s decision-making most often does not have the flexibility to consider lifelong production complications due to wellbore path and design. High deviation, doglegs or changes in direction lead to an increase in failure frequency when on reciprocating rod lift. It is imperative for sucker rod pumping to remain economical and reliable in modern wellbores.

A new manufacturing process led by product design has been commercialized for sucker rod pumping. Material science is paramount to the utilization of this new technology. Black Mamba Rod Lift’s sucker rod stabilizer is marketed as end-to-end sucker rod control for well operators. The Black Mamba, an over-molded helical centralizer, is available for use with traditional steel sucker rods and is rapidly finding its way through the marketplace.

Traditional deviated vertical wells feature doglegs and troublesome geometry farther down the wellbore. These areas are commonly addressed with consumable plastic 4-fin sucker rod guides or centralizers. The guides and centralizers prevent steel-on-steel wear between the rodstring and production tubing.

Offshore Facilities
Addressing obsolescence
Offshore Facilities
Addressing obsolescence
in control systems
Efforts to extend the life of oil and gas production assets may make it necessary to consider upgrading obsolete controls infrastructure.
Ryan M. Primeaux, PE, W-Industries
I

t is common for offshore oil and gas facility control systems to operate reliably for many years without major intervention. This is not surprising since reliability and availability are fundamental requirements in control system design. This high level of reliability is a desirable characteristic of these systems in the offshore environment since they support the oil and gas production processes and the essential self-supporting utilities and services of the asset.

However, a very robust control system that provides years of reliable service can bring about an associated lack of attention to the control system infrastructure that can lead to a hidden issue: unrecognized obsolescence. In this case, when an obsolete component finally does fail, it can be challenging to find replacement parts or repair services. It also can be difficult to find technicians with experience in older hardware or software platforms to service these systems. This may present a significant risk to production and unexpected interruptions in essential utilities and services.

Digital Solutions
Cloud-based safety platform enhances worker protection
A new digital technology delivers real-time notifications for improved worker safety and productivity.
Mary Holcomb, Associate Editor
T

he oil and gas industry’s safety culture will always be an area worth improving, no matter the market or a company’s financial standing. For many, an automated safety management solution is essential to meeting compliance requirements.

Honeywell has been at the forefront of developing applications that maintain compliance and recently added its cloud-based Safety Suite Real Time platform to its portfolio. The software application monitors workers’ exposure to gas, weather and physiological conditions in real time, according to Chris Tipton, Honeywell’s senior director of global services and connected safety.

The open platform provides a comprehensive view of safety data from multiple sites in real time, which enhances worker readiness while reducing incidents through early detection notifications. The insights from the technology help operators reduce compliance costs, streamline management tasks and capture data to review to prevent future incidents, Tipton said.

Tech Watch
tab-type flow conditioner with a mass flowmeter
Optimizing flow measurement accuracy to reduce costs
Smart flow conditioning projects pay for themselves.
Don Lundberg, Fluid Components International
P

lant projects that optimize flow measurement accuracy can result in significant cost savings while offering quality improvements and even a competitive advantage. The accurate measurement of gases, steam, liquids and slurries is critically important in oil and gas production, pipelines, refineries and many other types of petrochemical plants.

Unfortunately, the measurement of flow is often an afterthought—especially in many plant expansions, equipment upgrades and retrofit projects. The selection and placement of flow switches and flowmeters requires careful advance thought. Choosing the wrong flow sensing technology for an application or placing the flow instrument in the wrong location too closely to pumps or valves can eliminate potential cost savings and it frequently results in unnecessary replacement or relocation projects.

Southeast Asia illustation
Regional Report
Southeast Asia
Map of the Andaman Sea
Wet gas prospect spurs resource development in Andaman Sea
Development for Southeast Asia looks promising with exploration programs planned for 2021 and 2022.
Larry Prado, Activity Editor
F

ollowing an extensive 3D seismic survey and the confirmation of a large wet gas prospect in the southern Andaman Sea, Premier Oil and other major companies are planning to explore the gas and condensate potential.

The recent discovery in the sea by Premier Oil is near a mothballed LNG train at the onshore Arun facility on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia, in the Andaman II Block.

The large wet gas prospect has an estimated prospective resource of approximately 6 Tcf of gas and 200 MMbbl of condensate in each of the Andaman blocks. Field development and exploratory drilling is planned in 2022 for both prospects. The Andaman II license is located in the underexplored but proven offshore North Sumatra Basin, and exploration drilling is planned in the Andaman II and South Andaman blocks.

Tech Trends
New data analytics technologies
With the upstream industry navigating challenges due to remote operations, low oil prices and demand destruction, these new technologies, trends and collaborations in the area of data analytics will help companies increase efficiency and optimize operations.
New data analytics platform offers subsurface data insights
Katalyst Data Management has released its Katalyst 360 data analytics platform, which provides a 360-degree view of how subsurface data assets are being utilized within an organization. Katalyst 360 greatly expands the utility of Katalyst’s data management solutions, giving oil and gas companies the ability to gain greater insight into their valuable subsurface data assets. The platform features analytics dashboards that are synchronized to an oil and gas company’s subsurface data. The platform comes with ready-to-use dashboards that display multiple attributes such as project status, data completeness and process efficiency. Users also have the ability to easily create and customize their own dashboards for analytics specific to their needs. EP companies can easily extend their understanding of their data and draw insights from the entirety of their subsurface data investment. The new analytics platform was built for Katalyst Data Management’s iGlass multi-cloud database, which has more than 80 petabytes of subsurface data under management. Subsurface data managed by iGlass feeds the Katalyst 360 analytics environment, and plans are to further enrich the platform with oil and gas operational data, economic and production data as well as public data. The goal of Katalyst 360 is to enable oil and gas companies to use analytics to implement predictive and prescriptive actions.
Companies partner to bring natural language processing to software
mCloud Technologies Corp. has entered into a partnership with Aiqudo Inc., leveraging Aiqudo’s Q Actions Voice AI platform and Action Kit SDK to bring new voice-enabled interactions to the company’s AssetCare solutions for Connected Workers. By combining AssetCare with Aiqudo’s powerful Voice to Action platform, mobile field workers will be able to interact with AssetCare solutions through a custom digital assistant using natural language. In the field, industrial asset operators and field technicians will be able to communicate with experts, find documentation and pull up relevant asset data instantly and effortlessly. This will expedite the completion of asset inspections and operator rounds using hands-free, simple and intuitive natural commands via head-mounted smart glasses. Professionals will be able to call up information on demand with a single natural language request, eliminating the need to search using complex queries or special commands.
New data analytics platform offers subsurface data insights
Katalyst Data Management has released its Katalyst 360 data analytics platform, which provides a 360-degree view of how subsurface data assets are being utilized within an organization. Katalyst 360 greatly expands the utility of Katalyst’s data management solutions, giving oil and gas companies the ability to gain greater insight into their valuable subsurface data assets. The platform features analytics dashboards that are synchronized to an oil and gas company’s subsurface data. The platform comes with ready-to-use dashboards that display multiple attributes such as project status, data completeness and process efficiency. Users also have the ability to easily create and customize their own dashboards for analytics specific to their needs. EP companies can easily extend their understanding of their data and draw insights from the entirety of their subsurface data investment. The new analytics platform was built for Katalyst Data Management’s iGlass multi-cloud database, which has more than 80 petabytes of subsurface data under management. Subsurface data managed by iGlass feeds the Katalyst 360 analytics environment, and plans are to further enrich the platform with oil and gas operational data, economic and production data as well as public data. The goal of Katalyst 360 is to enable oil and gas companies to use analytics to implement predictive and prescriptive actions.
Companies partner to bring natural language processing to software
mCloud Technologies Corp. has entered into a partnership with Aiqudo Inc., leveraging Aiqudo’s Q Actions Voice AI platform and Action Kit SDK to bring new voice-enabled interactions to the company’s AssetCare solutions for Connected Workers. By combining AssetCare with Aiqudo’s powerful Voice to Action platform, mobile field workers will be able to interact with AssetCare solutions through a custom digital assistant using natural language. In the field, industrial asset operators and field technicians will be able to communicate with experts, find documentation and pull up relevant asset data instantly and effortlessly. This will expedite the completion of asset inspections and operator rounds using hands-free, simple and intuitive natural commands via head-mounted smart glasses. Professionals will be able to call up information on demand with a single natural language request, eliminating the need to search using complex queries or special commands.
US Highlights
US Map
1
Alaska

bp recompleted a Prudhoe Bay Field well in Alaska that was originally drilled in 2014 at the #06-22B Prudhoe Bay Unit. The well is in Section 2-10n-14e in Umiat Meridian. It was tested flowing 288 bbl of oil, 27.513 MMcf of gas and 1,051 bbl of water per day with a flowing tubing pressure was 903 psi. Production is from a Ivishak Shale perforated zone at 10,465 ft to 10,870 ft.

2
New Mexico

Oxy USA Inc. completed a Purple Sage Field-Wolfcamp well in Eddy County, N.M., ocated in Section 17-24s-29e. The #037H Salt Flat CC 20-29 Federal Com produced at a daily flow rate of 5,202 bbl of oil, 11.096 cf of gas and 9,516 bbl of water. Drilled to 20,363 ft (9,990 ft true vertical), production is from acidized and fractured perforations at 10,209 ft to 20,185 ft. Tested on a 21/64-inch choke, the shut-in casing pressure was 1,421 psi.

1
Alaska

bp recompleted a Prudhoe Bay Field well in Alaska that was originally drilled in 2014 at the #06-22B Prudhoe Bay Unit. The well is in Section 2-10n-14e in Umiat Meridian. It was tested flowing 288 bbl of oil, 27.513 MMcf of gas and 1,051 bbl of water per day with a flowing tubing pressure was 903 psi. Production is from a Ivishak Shale perforated zone at 10,465 ft to 10,870 ft.

2
New Mexico

Oxy USA Inc. completed a Purple Sage Field-Wolfcamp well in Eddy County, N.M., ocated in Section 17-24s-29e. The #037H Salt Flat CC 20-29 Federal Com produced at a daily flow rate of 5,202 bbl of oil, 11.096 cf of gas and 9,516 bbl of water. Drilled to 20,363 ft (9,990 ft true vertical), production is from acidized and fractured perforations at 10,209 ft to 20,185 ft. Tested on a 21/64-inch choke, the shut-in casing pressure was 1,421 psi.

International Highlights
International Map
1
Trinidad

Touchstone Exploration has announced final production test results from the #1ST1-Cascadura well in Trinidad’s Ortoire exploration block. Two sections were tested: an upper zone from 5,570 ft to 5,915 ft and a lower zone from 6,056 ft to 6,218 ft. The upper zone (Cruse and Herrera) had an absolute open flow rate of 390 MMcf/d of gas and averaged 5,472 boe/d (86% gas). The lower test (Herrera) flowed 92 MMcf/d with an average of 5,157 boe/d (87% gas). Both tests were limited by the capacity of surface test equipment.

2
Guyana

Exxon Mobil Corp. has mobilized a drillship to drill and perform an exploratory test in offshore Guyana’s Kaieteur Block. The venture, #1-Tanager, is targeting prospective resources of 256.2 MMbbl of oil. Current estimates for the site range from 135.6 MMbbl to 451.6 MMbbl of oil. The planned depth is 8,000 m, targeting the stacked Maastrichtian to Turonian reservoir intervals in the southern part of the block. The #1-Tanager is the first well in a potential multiwell drilling campaign being operated by Exxon Mobil on the Kaieteur and Canje Blocks over the next six to 12 months. This campaign will evaluate high-impact, Upper Cretaceous prospects in the Liza play fairway with possible multiple stacked reservoir targets.

1
Trinidad

Touchstone Exploration has announced final production test results from the #1ST1-Cascadura well in Trinidad’s Ortoire exploration block. Two sections were tested: an upper zone from 5,570 ft to 5,915 ft and a lower zone from 6,056 ft to 6,218 ft. The upper zone (Cruse and Herrera) had an absolute open flow rate of 390 MMcf/d of gas and averaged 5,472 boe/d (86% gas). The lower test (Herrera) flowed 92 MMcf/d with an average of 5,157 boe/d (87% gas). Both tests were limited by the capacity of surface test equipment.

2
Guyana

Exxon Mobil Corp. has mobilized a drillship to drill and perform an exploratory test in offshore Guyana’s Kaieteur Block. The venture, #1-Tanager, is targeting prospective resources of 256.2 MMbbl of oil. Current estimates for the site range from 135.6 MMbbl to 451.6 MMbbl of oil. The planned depth is 8,000 m, targeting the stacked Maastrichtian to Turonian reservoir intervals in the southern part of the block. The #1-Tanager is the first well in a potential multiwell drilling campaign being operated by Exxon Mobil on the Kaieteur and Canje Blocks over the next six to 12 months. This campaign will evaluate high-impact, Upper Cretaceous prospects in the Liza play fairway with possible multiple stacked reservoir targets.

On The Move
Illustration of person moving up in clouds
Illustration of person moving up in clouds
PEOPLE

Iraq has appointed its oil minister, Ishan Ismael, to lead the Iraq National Oil Co.

TechnipFMC has named Arnaud Pieton president and CEO-elect of Technip Energies. Jonathan Landes has been appointed president of subsea. Additionally, Margareth Øvrum has been appointed to TechnipFMC’s board of directors.

Petrofac has announced that its current group CEO, Ayman Asfari, will step down at the end of 2020 to focus on his health, family and charity. He will be succeeded by Sami Iskander, effective Jan. 1, 2021.

Ring Energy Inc. has named Paul D. McKinney CEO and chairman of the board of directors.

Iain Gault headshot
Gault
Quality Companies has appointed Iain Gault business development manager. Based in Houston, Gault will serve to grow the client base in the deepwater and international arenas and introduce an expanded range of the company’s services to the energy sector.
Neil Manfred has been named Airswift’s IT director.
Eric Mullins headshot
Mullins
ConocoPhillips has announced that its board of directors has elected Eric Mullins to serve as a board member. Mullins currently serves as co-CEO of Lime Rock Resources, a private-equity fund focused on acquiring and developing low-risk oil and gas properties.
PEOPLE

Iraq has appointed its oil minister, Ishan Ismael, to lead the Iraq National Oil Co.

TechnipFMC has named Arnaud Pieton president and CEO-elect of Technip Energies. Jonathan Landes has been appointed president of subsea. Additionally, Margareth Øvrum has been appointed to TechnipFMC’s board of directors.

Petrofac has announced that its current group CEO, Ayman Asfari, will step down at the end of 2020 to focus on his health, family and charity. He will be succeeded by Sami Iskander, effective Jan. 1, 2021.

Ring Energy Inc. has named Paul D. McKinney CEO and chairman of the board of directors.

EPPlus September 2020 logo
Publisher
darrin west

Tel: 713-260-6449
dwest@hartenergy.com

Global Sales Manager
HENRY TINNE

Tel: 713-260-6478
htinne@hartenergy.com

Executive Director of Conference Marketing
Bill miller

Tel: 713-260-1067
bmiller@hartenergy.com

Executive Director—Digital Media
Danny Foster

Tel: 713-260-6437
dfoster@hartenergy.com

Director, Business Development
CHANTAL HAGEN

Tel: 713.260.5204
chagen@hartenergy.com

United States/Canada/Latin America

1616 S. Voss Road, Suite 1000
Houston, Texas 77057 USA
Tel: 713-260-6400
Toll Free: 800-874-2544
Fax: 713-627-2546

Advertising Coordinators
CAROL NUNEZ

Tel: 713-260-6408
iosubmission@hartenergy.com

SUSET MEDEROS

Tel: 713-260-4637
iosubmission@hartenergy.com

Subscription Services

E&P Plus
1616 S. Voss Road, Suite 1000
Houston, Texas 77057
Tel: 713-260-6442
Fax: 713-840-1449
custserv@hartenergy.com

Last Word
Businessman shouting into a megaphone
A service provider’s perspective on the energy transition
A willingness to step outside comfort zones will enable the OFS industry to make meaningful contributions to the energy transition.
Businessman shouting into a megaphone
Tanya Herwanger, TGS
A

ccording to the Energy Progress Report 2020, an annual report that tracks progress on Sustainable Development Goal 7 (SDG7) “Affordable and Clean Energy,” 789 million people globally still lack access to electricity, and 2.8 billion people—over one-third of the global population—lack the means to cleanly and safely cook.

Additionally, the U.N. advises that lack of access to energy may hamper efforts to contain COVID-19 across many parts of the world because energy is critical to operating healthcare facilities, providing clean water and enabling communications during times of social distancing. The 2020 report shows some progress toward 2030 targets under SDG7 as well as significant work if society is to achieve universal access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy.

E+P Plus logo
Thanks for reading our November 2020 issue!